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Oak Blanket Chest

by John W. Nixon on October 20 2007 03:00

Currently rated 4.5 by 38 people

  • Currently 4.473684/5 Stars.
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Project Description

Watch every aspect of the construction and finishing of this handsome dovetailed blanket chest unfold. The blanket chest features a framed top with exposed spline joints, dovetailed construction, a full mortise lock set, lid support, and more!


This 23 minutes video shows each step of the process from stock preparation all the way through applying the finish!


The video covers:

  • Gluing up wide panels.
  • Making a dovetailed box.
  • Pattern routing.
  • Spline joints.
  • My Shop-made laminate press.
  • Installing hardware - hinges, lid support, & lockset.
  • 3 step finish process using dye, stain and polyurethane.

Interested in the history of the blanket chest? Read more here here

Comments

6/29/2010 12:44:18 PM
United States
Gary
Posted by:
Dude the chest is awesome.  I have always wanted to make a cedar chest, but after seeing yours, I think I will use oak.  

5/4/2009 10:40:51 PM
Spain
Posted by:
CONGRATULATIONS

ESTE lugar le doy 100 estrellas
THIS PLACE IS VERY VERY GOOD
SUGERENCIA: QUE EL VIDEO ESTUBIERA DOBLADO AL ESPAÑOL

MUCHAS GRACIAS
1/25/2009 8:48:03 AM
United Kingdom
steve holden
Posted by:
Reply to comment from John W. Nixon who wrote:
Reply to comment from Jeff Johnston who wrote:
Is there a standard practice dictating which side o...


Hi John
I once read an article on old nauticle chests which indicated the pins and tails should be oriented to prevent the box ends pulling out, especially with a large chest where it would normally be lifted by two people. Each person would naturally lean/pull outwards while lifting to maintain their balance.
12/26/2008 9:05:41 AM
United States
Posted by:
Reply to comment from Jeff Johnston who wrote:
Is there a standard practice dictating which side of a box corner gets which half of a dovetail join...


Great question Jeff.  I agree with your explanation regarding the orientation for drawers - makes perfect sense.  For chests and boxes, I'm not sure there is a universally accepted approach.  After seeing your comment, I went back and looked at the keepsake box and tend to agree with you (that it would have looked better the other way).

I'm going to do some digging and see if I can come up with a recommended approach (and some rationale for doing so).

Thanks for the good question!
12/23/2008 1:04:00 AM
United States
Jeff Johnston
Posted by:
Is there a standard practice dictating which side of a box corner gets which half of a dovetail joint? Naturally, on a drawer, the joint is made so the mechanical locking action reinforces the drawer front from being pulled off; and we can live with the lack of the mechanical locking action in the perpendicular direction.

On the oak blanket chest, the joint is positioned as if the front and back of the chest (the long sides) were the drawer fronts; however, on the cocobolo keepsake box, it's reversed. The joint is made as if to keep the ends locked against pulling out. Did you intend this? Does it matter? Personally, I think it looks better with the tails showing on the ends, like the blanket chest.
12/21/2008 11:29:51 AM
United States
John W. Nixon
Posted by:
Reply to comment from who wrote:
Just one question. Why is John working on the floor?


My workshop is too small!
12/19/2008 4:43:22 AM
Turkey
vahit
Posted by:
TAM BİR EMEK İŞİ...
9/22/2008 2:19:24 PM
United States
Posted by:
Just one question. Why is John working on the floor?
8/27/2008 5:02:46 PM
United States
Posted by:
You're well on your way to becomming one of the MIP's (Men In Plaid) on PBS and the DIY network, John.   Bravo, sir.  Excellent presentation and nice project.    Best,  Matt Seiler
8/10/2008 4:18:23 PM
United States
Posted by:
Great woodworking and video job.
7/29/2008 10:19:50 PM
United States
Posted by:
Excellent and informitive video.

ToolKing
6/22/2008 9:51:31 PM
United States
Posted by:
Outstanding workmanship again John.

John Morello
6/6/2008 10:26:23 PM
United States
Posted by:
Very nice John.
5/17/2008 9:05:14 PM
United States
Posted by:
merci beaucoup
5/17/2008 5:41:31 PM
United States
Posted by:
The only problem with most of your videos is the lack of using push sticks. CMW558
5/11/2008 6:53:38 AM
United States
Posted by:
John, Inspiring instructional video. "Woodworking is 99% problem solving, the rest is 1%".
Pattern Maker
5/8/2008 5:02:14 PM
United States
Posted by:
Bravo.  Wonderful job and video.
4/14/2008 8:25:19 PM
United States
Posted by:
Nicely done... John
Neil
3/22/2008 3:57:05 AM
United States
Posted by:
2/13/2008 2:47:10 PM
United States
Posted by:
Just super John. I liked the way you mounted the top. Its so easy with the triangles that I did't think about to do it that way. As my dad use to say, " you wll always learn something new if you get the correct source of knowledge". In this case you are that source John. Tks for the teaching...Luis
2/8/2008 5:05:09 PM
United States
Posted by:
Move over Norm! You've got some new competition for informative and well-crafted woodworking videos!
12/28/2007 10:34:08 PM
United States
Posted by:
Very nice vids, tips, shop and jigs! Thanks!!!
11/24/2007 5:17:54 AM
United States
Posted by:
John, Nice box, great video.  I would have used different top supports though - maybe something more traditional -  those large black hydraulic ones you used look like they belong on the back of a hatchback car or under the lid of a Craftsman toolchest.

10/31/2007 11:13:23 AM
United States
Posted by:
awsome use of dove-tail joinery and it looks great
10/25/2007 8:25:13 AM
United States
Posted by:
Nice Job and good video with narriation.  It was informative for viewing only, but not the reproduction.  No measurements, dimensions or specification given.  That's OK.  For me, it would have been nice to heard the dimensions and measurements.  Something like NYW does for their PBS series.

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